Mobile WiMAX Physical Network Best Server Modeling - Sponsored Whitepaper

Sponsored by:
EDX Wireless LLC Logo
EDX Wireless LLC
Download Entire Whitepaper
In a multi-sector communication system such as WiMAX the performance of the network is heavily influenced by the traffic load on each sector as well as the ability of mobile units to smoothly move from one sector to another. Accurately knowing how a sector will serve a particular geographic area is fundamental to understanding these two issues when planning or designing a network. Much of this challenge is answering the "Best Server" question. Knowing which sector is the primary server for a mobile unit will greatly enhance the understanding of the effect of that mobile's data needs on the network as well as how to properly provide a smooth mobile handoff as it moves among sectors. Obviously, only during operation of a built-out network where each mobile is reporting its real-time signal level status can the ultimate answer to the "Best Server" question be found. But, by using proper study methods, this same information can be accurately estimated during the initial system design stage. This paper explores the Best Server issues that are important to WiMAX and shows a way to more effectively use a planning tool to model the operation of the network.

In the past, planning tools and design engineers have simply run signal level studies on all the servers in the network and assigned geographical service areas on the basis of the server providing the best (strongest) downlink signal to the remote unit. While this is a straightforward way to approach the problem and works well in many cases, it is not the best approach to take when dealing with systems using adaptive modulation techniques such as those found in WiMAX networks.

Technology White Paper Mobile WiMAX Physical Network Best Server Modeling

Figure one shows an example of base stations that make up a simple four site WiMAX mobile system. Each base site is comprised of three 10MHz sectors. The frequency reuse is three meaning the same three RF channels (one per sector) are used at each site. This can be seen on the map by noting the regular pattern of sector icon colors that represent each of the three channels. To show the basic coverage afforded by this system one can do a traditional propagation study that shows the received signal at a mobile unit. This study simply calculates the received signal level from all sectors at each remote location and chooses the strongest signal regardless of the channel (frequency) in use. The following study in Figure 2 shows the results of this type of study where the colors represent various ranges of received signal at the mobile unit.

Technology White Paper Mobile WiMAX Physical Network Best Server Modeling
Download Entire Whitepaper
Copyright © 2014, Questex Media Group LLC
Company descriptions and contact information are quoted from the company's website or other promotional information. Questex is not responsible for the accuracy of this information. Unless specifically noted, Questex is not sponsored by, affiliated with or otherwise connected with any of the listed companies.